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Archive for April, 2009


Taken on 2 Feb 09

 

Lijssenthoek MilItary Cemetery

Lijssenthoek MilItary Cemetery

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Aeroplane Cemetery


 

Aeroplane Cemetery

Aeroplane Cemetery

 

 

Aeroplane Cemetery is located 3.5 kilometres north east of Ieper town centre on the Zonnebeekseweg (N332), a road connecting Ieper to Zonnebeke. Two roads connect Ieper town centre onto the Zonnebeekseweg; the Torhoutstraat leads from the market square onto a small roundabout. At the roundabout the first right turn is Basculestraat. At the end of Basculestraat there is a crossroads and Zonnebeekseweg is the turning to the left. The cemetery itself lies 3 kilometres along the Zonnebeekseweg on the right hand side of the road, shortly after a French cemetery.

From October 1914 to the summer of 1918, Ypres (now Ieper) was the centre of a salient held by Commonwealth (and for some months also by French) forces. The site of the cemetery was in No Man’s Land before 31 July 1917 when the 15th (Scottish) Division, with the 55th (West Lancashire) Division on their left, took nearby Verlorenhoek and Frezenberg. The cemetery was begun the following month (under the name of the New Cemetery, Frezenberg) by the 15th and the 16th (Irish) Divisions, but by October it had acquired its present name from the wreck of an aeroplane which lay near the present position of the Cross of Sacrifice. It was used by fighting units until March 1918, and again, after a period of occupation by the Germans, in September 1918. Plots II to VIII, and part of Plot I, were formed after the Armistice when graves were brought in from small burial grounds and the surrounding battlefields. The only considerable burial grounds concentrated into Aeroplane Cemetery were the following: BEDFORD HOUSE CEMETERY (ENCLOSURE No. 5), ZILLEBEKE, a little East of the Ypres-Wytschaete Road. This enclosure, which was separate from the others now forming Bedford House Cemetery, contained the graves of 14 men of the 1st Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry and six of the 1st Devons who fell in April, 1915. LOCK 8 CEMETERY, VOORMEZEELE, in a field about 200 metres North of Lock 8 on the Ypres-Comines Canal. It contained the graves of 19 soldiers from the United Kingdom and two from Australia and two German prisoners, who fell in July-September, 1917. There are now 1,105 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 636 of the burials are unidentified but special memorials commemorate eight casualties known or believed to be buried among them. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.

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Eric George Chapman is not featured in the book “At The Going Down of The Sun” but as we drove along the Zonnebeekseweg (N332) to Ypres we stopped to pay our respects in Aeroplane Cemetery.

We noticed a flag and information on Eric’s grave so I decided to take this picture and hope that his family will see this post and know that his grave is still well tended.

 

Eric George Padman,Aeroplane Cemetery

Eric George Padman,Aeroplane Cemetery

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On 28th Dec 1917 a small patrol of the Dukes’,Cpl Aspin and three men,encountered a party about 20 strong which they believed to be New Zealanders from a neighbouring battalion.However it proved to be the Germans clad in long white coats and armed with revolvers.They soon surrounded the small British patrol,capturing one man but three attempted to escape.As they reached the British wire there was a scuffle and Pte Daley was shot and killed.

Harry Daley,a native of Leeds,is buried in Tyne Cot Cemetery.

 

Harry Daley,Tyne Cot Cemetery

Harry Daley,Tyne Cot Cemetery

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From “Death’s Men” by John Ellis:

“Phosgene,a derivative of chlorine,had eighteen times its power and could not be seen.Its insidiousness was that,even when inhaled in fatal doses,it was not always immediately irritating,just smelling faintly of mouldy hay and producing a slight sensation of suffocation.(The inventor of the gas was able to enjoy a late-night party after first sniffing his creation and before dying from it).Then would come shallow breathing and retching,pulse up to 120,an ashen face and the discharge of four pints of yellow fluid from the lungs each hour for the 48 hour drowning spasm..”

Clarence Grosvener Ridout died of gas inhaled in trenches at La Brique on the morning of 19 December 1915.It took him 2 days to die.He is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery.

 

Lt Clarence Grosvener Ridout,Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery.

Lt Clarence Grosvener Ridout,Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery.

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The Leicesters were subjected to a phosgene gas attack near St Jean during which 7 men,including Daniel Hinton,were killed.

Total British casualties from the gas attack were 1,069 with 20 deaths.

Daniel John Hinton from the English Civil was battlefield town of Naseby is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery.

 

Daniel John Hinton,Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery

Daniel John Hinton,Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery

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The 11th King’s-  a pioneer battalion- were often stationed in the city of Ypres itself,sometimes in the cellars of the old prison.Being in this epicentre of violence on a grand scale obviously brought its own dangers.

On 13 December 1917 a party of the King’s were caught out in the open and 5 men were killed in as many minutes. 

Private P Lovelady,a 21 year old dockworker from Bootle,was one of them.He is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery.

 

Pte P Lovelady,Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery

Pte P Lovelady,Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery

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