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Archive for July, 2009


Apologies for the poor quality,I took this video on my mobile phone. I hope,though, that you can still feel some of the atmosphere which fills the Mmemorial while the service is underway.

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Doris was the daughter of Harry and Sarah Ann of Sedgeley,Staffordshire. She was only 21 when she died which meant that had she lived she would have been 85 today.

Her grave in Ghent City Cemetery caught my eye as its one of the very few female graves Ive seen in the Commonwealth War Grave Cemeteries of Europe.

I hope that one of her friends or relatives may see this post and tell the story of what befell Doris.

Doris Fellows,Ghent City Cemetery

Doris Fellows,Ghent City Cemetery

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Ghent City Cemetery, 13 June 2009

Ghent City Cemetery, 13 June 2009

Gent (also known as Ghent) was occupied by French Marines and the British 7th Division early in October 1914, but evacuated on the 11th. It them remained in German hands until reoccupied by the Belgians on 10 November 1918. The Germans returned to Gent in May 1940 and remained there until the city’s liberation on 10 September 1944. In May 1940, the main fighting around Gent occurred near the junction of the Ghent-Bruges and Ternenzen canals, and in September 1944, it was the northern part of the city that was most heavily affected. Gent City Cemetery contains military plots of many nationalities, including Commonwealth. The First World War Commonwealth graves, which total 86, are prisoners of war buried there during the German occupation, plus two brought in from JABBEKE CHURCHYARD after the Armistice. In addition, nearby, are 111 of the Second World War.

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Cecil Richard Blagrove, Ghent City Cemetery

Cecil Richard Blagrove, Ghent City Cemetery

Flight Lieutenant Cecil Richard Blagrove and his observer,Air Mechanic J Milne, were killed in air combat over German-occupied Beligium.

He is buried in Ghent City Cemetery.

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Hospital Farm Cemetery,13 June 09

Hospital Farm Cemetery,13 June 09

Hospital Farm was the name given to a farm building used as a dressing station. The cemetery was used particularly in 1915 and in 1917 by regiments and batteries engaged in the fighting around Ypres. The cemetery contains 115 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and one French war grave. The cemetery was designed by N A Rew.

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Although not featured in the book “At The Going Down of The Sun” I have included Pte Seal’s grave in my blog as I passed Hospital Farm many times and as it is in secluded spot I stopped to have a look. I noticed a story about Albert and his friend in the Grave Register along with an email address but I have misplaced this. I hope that person sees this post and photo and gets in touch.

Albert Seal was the son of Stephen and Hanna Seal. He was only 17 when he was killed on the 23rd of July 1917.

He is buried in Hospital Farm Cemetery.

Albert Seal, Hospital Farm Cemetery

Albert Seal, Hospital Farm Cemetery

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Hagle Dump Cemetery,13 June 2009

Hagle Dump Cemetery,13 June 2009

Elverdinge was behind the Allied front line throughout the war, and Hospital Farm and Ferme-Olivier Cemeteries, both in the commune, were used in the earlier years for Commonwealth burials. The cemetery, which was begun in April 1918, during the Battles of Lys, was named after a nearby stores dump. It was used by fighting units and field ambulances until the following October and was enlarged after the Armistice when more than 200 graves were brought into Plots III and IV from the battlefields of the Ypres Salient. BRIELEN MILITARY CEMETERY, from which 20 graves were brought to Hagle Dump, was used from April 1915 to September 1917. Hagle Dump Cemetery contains 437 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, 140 of which are unidentified. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.

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